Topics

Workforce Supply

Workforce supply represents the number of people working or available to work in health care settings. Depending on the situation, some supply estimates also incorporate specific adjustments that reflect capacity for work and productivity. For example, FTE (ie, full-time equivalent) estimates are based on the number of hours a person works a week to determine who is considered full-time.

Topics: COVID-19, Nursing, Staffing, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

October 20, 2021
This report explores how direct care workers and workers from similar entry-level occupations became unemployed during the COVID-19 pandemic; to what extent the skills of displaced workers align with those of direct care occupations; and how many displaced workers re-entered the workforce (including into direct care jobs) within the following year.
More Info
UCSF Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care logo
October 5, 2021
This webinar examines employment trends throughout the US health care delivery system, as well as employment and earnings trends of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nursing assistants.
More Info

Presenters: Peter Buerhaus | Douglas Staiger | David Auerbach

Topics: COVID-19, Nursing, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

September 13, 2021
This report reviews the supply and demand of registered nurses in California and how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the workforce.
More Info
UCSF Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care logo

Presenters: Peter Buerhaus | Douglas Staiger | David Auerbach

Topics: Nursing, Staffing, Workforce Supply

August 3, 2021
This article examines turnover among home health nurses, focusing on the role of schedule volatility.
More Info
UCSF Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care logo

Presenters: Peter Buerhaus | Douglas Staiger | David Auerbach

Topics: Data Visualization, Rural Health, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

July 22, 2021
This StoryMap explores where people with disabilities who need help with self-care and daily activities live, and compare that to where Personal Care Aides (PCAs) are located. This will help to better understand if there are enough PCA workers available where they are needed.
More Info
UCSF Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care logo