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Health Workforce Models and Projections

Health Workforce Models and Projections refer to the innovative and groundbreaking analytic techniques used to advance health care and health workforce research. These models often forecast health care provider supply and demand several years into the future.

Topics: COVID-19, Health Workforce Models and Projections, Scope of Practice (SOP), Staffing, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

June 2, 2021
This brief defines the range of work statuses that one can hold, identifies areas where overlap may create confusion, and discusses the potential long-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on employment in the health care industry.
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University of Washington Center for Health Workforce Studies logo

Topics: Health Workforce Models and Projections, Workforce Demand

May 5, 2021
This article examines the work and practice satisfaction of licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs) participating in the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) federal Loan Repayment Program. Findings have the potential to inform the NHSC's strategies in managing and retaining LCSWs.
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Carolina Health Workforce Research Center logo

Topics: COVID-19, Health Workforce Models and Projections, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

February 1, 2021
This article describes how data was used in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in North Carolina to support decisions about the deployment, surge, and maintenance of necessary health care staff.
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Carolina Health Workforce Research Center logo

Topics: Health Workforce Models and Projections, Workforce Demand, Workforce Supply

November 30, 2020
This article examines the IFED physician workforce composition and changes in emergency physician workforce supply across states and in rural Texas.
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GW Health Workforce Research Center logo

Topics: Health Workforce Models and Projections, Long-Term Care

June 20, 2020
This article discusses a study that utilized 16 years of data from the American Time Use Survey, which examines the financial vulnerability of high-skill and low-skill LTSS workers in comparison with other health care workers, and provides insight into their well-being by measuring time spent on work and non-work activities.
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UCSF Health Workforce Research Center on Long-Term Care logo